Cody Schultz


I believe I have always loved photography and that this had always been what I was meant to do with my life. Ever since I was young, I loved taking pictures of anything and everything that fascinated me in some way, shape, or form. However, my journey into "professionalism" - if you wish to call it that - began in 2014 when I bought my first DSLR, a Nikon d3200. Before really getting into a specific genre of photography, I took plenty of pictures of everything, just as I had when I was younger. From my dog to flowers to the landscape around me, I am sure I have at least a single picture of every subject available to me at the time.

My journey into portrait photography began a few months after I had purchased the camera. Using Melanie as my subject, I took photos of her almost every day that I could, while also researching how I could get better. She has been very supportive of me throughout my journey as I found out - and continue to find out - who I am meant to be. From 2014 up until the summer of 2016, I was obsessed with portraiture. Anything that had to do with human emotion - especially that of fashion and beauty photography - was something I wanted to make a career out of. However, that all ended rather abruptly when I found my joy in landscape photography the summer of 2016.

All thanks to Thomas Heaton and Ansel Adams - both wonderful photographers - landscape photography caught my eye. I began to realize just how much emotion and beauty there is in the world around me. I began to realize that nature did not cancel on me. It did not fight back with me. It did not pressure me into sharing all the photographs I took. It did not force me to take down images that I posted that did not show its "best side." I began to realize just how much I love to be out in nature, whether alone or with a friend, and how peaceful it truly is. Being out in nature has helped not only my mental health but also my physical. Overall, landscape photography has been my savior. And I love it for so many more reasons than I would have ever been able to love portrait work.